Homestead Act
 


Press Review
02/23/2020 09 hours
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The Homestead Act and Westward Expansion: Setting the Western Frontier (Spotlight on American History)
The Homestead Act and Westward Expansion: Setting the Western Frontier (Spotlight on American History)
In the 19th century, thousands of Americans left their homes behind and set out for a life on the western frontier. This period of westward expansion had a huge hand in shaping the culture and identity of the United States. This title explores the push and pull factors that encouraged settlers to migrate, including the Homestead Act and similar policies. The text uses historical context and primary sources to provide a comprehensive look at westward expansion. Written to support elementary social studies curricula, readers will walk away with an understanding of the 19th century American West and the legacy settling it left behind.

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$10.00



The Homestead Act of 1862: A Primary Source History of the Settlement of the American Heartland in the Late 19th Century (Primary Sources in American History)
The Homestead Act of 1862: A Primary Source History of the Settlement of the American Heartland in the Late 19th Century (Primary Sources in American History)
Presents primary source documents, narrative, and illustrations to explain the concept of the Homestead Act, a plan to settle the plain states in the central United States.

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$34.17
-$1.28(-4%)



The Homestead Act (True Books)
The Homestead Act (True Books)
Describes the purpose of the Homestead Act, who qualified for it, and how it benefited America.

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Malice Toward None: Abraham Lincoln, the Civil War, the Homestead Act, and the Massacre --and Heartening Survival--of the Kochendorfers
Malice Toward None: Abraham Lincoln, the Civil War, the Homestead Act, and the Massacre --and Heartening Survival--of the Kochendorfers
A gravestone inscription leads the author on a search through early Minnesota history, and then U.S. and Civil War history. He discovers that four siblings orphaned by the Dakota War commissioned that inscription in memory of their parents and younger sister, and that their many descendants now live all around him. Those quiet descendants have kept many wonderful family records, and in those letters and photographs he learns that those four brave orphans lived lives of tolerance and gratitude, lives that answered President Lincoln's hopes in that Second Inaugural Address.

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$14.95



American Singularity: The 1787 Northwest Ordinance, The 1862 Homestead And Morrill Acts, and the 1944 G.I. Bill (The Richard B. Russell Lecture Ser.)
American Singularity: The 1787 Northwest Ordinance, The 1862 Homestead And Morrill Acts, and the 1944 G.I. Bill (The Richard B. Russell Lecture Ser.)
Since the first shots rang out at Lexington and Concord, signaling the beginning of open war between the colonies and England, America has been credited with a singular conviction, a concern for military veterans' and others' economic and political rights. The idea of America as a promised land of economic opportunity, social mobility, and political freedom has not always flourished. Historians have both given it reality and shaken its substance as they exposed an undercurrent of greed, class conflict, and corruption.In this book Harold Hyman explores the question of American singularity, using the Northwest Ordinance, the Homestead and Morrill acts, and the G.I Bill to measure individual access to land, education, and law.The Northwest Ordinance, enacted in 1787 to encourage settlement of the nation's untamed territories, mandated the establishment of public schools and stable property rights in newly settled lands--specific terms which enshrined the basic liberties secured by the Revolutionary War. Hyman shows that through the Homestead and Morrill acts of 1862, legislators sought to preserve the values of the Union and to prepare for the entrance of the black man into citizenship. Equal access to public lands in the West and to state land-grant universities, countered the economic and social injustices blacks and poor whites would face after the Civil War. Finally, Hyman asserts that the G.I. Bill preserved beneficial social programs forged during the depression, carrying into post-World War II America a widespread concern for education and housing opportunities.Examining the legislation that emerged from three periods of conflict in American history, Hyman reveals a consistent pattern favoring equal access to land, education, and law--a progression of singular, if sometimes flawed, attempts to embody in our statutes the values and aspirations that sparked our major wars.

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$22.02
-$0.93(-4%)



The Story of the Homestead Act (Cornerstones of Freedom)
The Story of the Homestead Act (Cornerstones of Freedom)
Discusses the 1804 Homestead act that offered United States citizens and immigrants large tracts of inexpensive land on the Great Plains.

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$14.46



Agrarianism and Reconstruction Politics: The Southern Homestead Act
Agrarianism and Reconstruction Politics: The Southern Homestead Act
At the close of the Civil War, the Federal government undertook a sweeping reform of land tenure in the South with the passage of the Southern Homestead Act of 1866. Designed primarily to allow freedmen to settle public land and take part in the great agrarian program of establishing a nation of independent yeoman farmers, the act soon became the victim of political abuses, bureaucratic ineptitude, and burgeoning racism. In Agrarianism and Reconstruction Politics, Michael L. Lanza studies the conception, evolution, and demise of this critical aspect of Reconstruction history.Lanza deals with the formulation of the act in Congress, the implementation of new land regulations in the southern states, and the distribution of land to the hopeful body of southern freedmen. As Lanza points out, however, the homesteaders faced obstacles and disappointments at almost every turn. White southerners vehemently opposed black landownership and did everything possible to stand in the freemen's way. Furthermore, much of the land allocated to the homesteaders proved unfarmable. An unwieldy, sometimes dishonest bureaucracy and a lessening of support from the Republican party were additional barriers that prevented the Southern Homestead Act from living up to its promise. Lanza relies on letters written by many homesteaders to paint a vivid picture of their hopes, frustrations, achievements, and failures.Historians have long debated the centrality of land distribution policies to Reconstruction history. But until now one has fully considered the single most important measure adopted during Reconstruction to provide land to the landless. Drawing on records of the General Land Office, contemporaneous newspaper accounts, and other sources, Michael Lanza's study of the Southern Homestead Act provides a significant new interpretation of land policy during this era.

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$52.12



Arctic Homestead: The True Story of One Family's Survival and Courage in the Alaskan Wilds
Arctic Homestead: The True Story of One Family's Survival and Courage in the Alaskan Wilds
In 1973, Norma Cobb, her husband Lester and the their five children, the oldest of whom was nine years old and the youngest, twins, barely one, pulled up stakes in the lower 48 and headed north to Alaska to follow a pioneer dream of claiming land under the Homestead Act. The only land available lay north of Fairbanks near the Arctic Circle where grizzlies outnumbered humans twenty to one. In addition to fierce winters and predatory animals, the Alaskan frontier drew the more unsavory elements of society's fringes. From the beginning, the Cobbs found themselves pitted in a life or death feud with unscrupulous neighbors who would rob from new settlers, attempt to burn them out, shoot them and jump their claim.The Cobbs were chechakos, tenderfeet, in a lost land that consumed even toughened settlers. Everything, including their "civilized" past, conspired to defeat them. They constructed a cabin--and first snow collapsed the roof. They built too near the creek and spring breakup threatened to flood them out. Bears prowled the nearby woods, stalking the children and Lester Cobb would leave for months at a time in search of work.But through it all, they survived on the strength of Norma Cobb--a woman whose love for her family knew no bounds and whose courage in the face of mortal danger is an inspiration to us all. Arctic Homestead is her story.

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Montana Woman
Montana Woman
A NATION DIVIDED ONE WOMAN?S UNBRIDLED SPIRITA Civil War widow, young Joline Masters leaves ?bleeding? Kansas for Montana to settle under the Homestead Act. Mountain man Clint Reeves knows Montana well, having lost a wife and child there to an Indian attack. He has come home to Kansas, but his father-in-law and others blame him for his wife?s and he child?s deaths. Chance brings Clint and Joline together, and, feeling unwanted in Kansas, Clint agrees to take Joline to Montana.Clint and Joline are both brave, strong-willed people who balance off each other?s strengths and courage, both of which are uniquely tested by the challenges of a lawless land filled with outlaws and Indians. As they help each other forge a new future, passion and desire become part of their determination to succeed in a new land. Through hardship and danger, two broken hearts become one full heart. Together Jo and Clint tame the savage land and learn to live with past tragedies to form new joys and a life shared as one.

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Jackrabbit Homestead: Tracing the Small Tract Act in the Southern California Landscape (Center for American Places - Center Books on the American West)
Jackrabbit Homestead: Tracing the Small Tract Act in the Southern California Landscape (Center for American Places - Center Books on the American West)
The landscape of the Morongo Basin of Southern California?s Mojave Desert is dotted with unusual buildings and parcels of land that developed as a result of the Small Tract Act of 1938. The structures, which are remnants of a mid-century homestead movement, have become a lightning rod for seemingly disparate communities wishing to claim and inhabit the desert landscape.In Jackrabbit Homestead, Kim Stringfellow, an artist and writer known for her cross-disciplinary work addressing the American West, land use, and the built environment, documents the character of the homestead architecture and the homesteaders who built it. Alongside her compelling photographs, she explores the origins of the Homestead movement, the Public Land Survey, and other U.S. public land policies that have shaped our perception and long-term management of the California desert.Richly illustrated with Stringfellow?s color photographs and historical illustrations, Jackrabbit Homestead is an essential document of American landscape history.

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